Are Real Estate Seminars Real or Fake?

If you’re in the real estate business, you have probably heard about the seminars organized by some people to help you with your business. Some of these are free, while others are paid.

Some people argue over the idea of honesty in these events. Some people claim that these events are not made for the benefit of the agents or companies, but for making profits.

The problem here is, how someone will make profits if they aren’t charging anything? This is the main issue over which people argue. It’s good to know that things are never as simple as they appear at the first moment. In this article, we’re going to go over this issue a little more and try to explain if these seminars are real or fake. Follow up and learn more!

What is happening in this kind of event?

There are always different topics that people organize and you can attend them depending on the interest in a certain field. For example, there might be a topic about how to handle a house that no one wants to buy for years, or something else. If you have no cases with this topic, then why wasting time on this, right?

If you like the subject in the ad, then you can give them a visit. In the event, a professional in a certain field will talk about the issues that were mentioned previously. They will explain how certain things can be done and what the things you should mind while working are. See what most of them look like here.

This is where the catch with the free seminars comes into play. They’ll probably offer some kind of solution that is paid. If you want to solve your problem easily, you’ll have to pay for this service, and that’s where they profit.

Still, this is not a bad thing if you manage to learn a thing or two at this seminar. There’s no need for arguing if both sides win something. If these guys are happy with a sign or two from the people visiting their seminar, and you’re happy with the things you’ve heard and learned, then everyone got something out of it.

What about paid seminars?

The paid seminars are made on a much professional level. In these events highly trained and skilled in certain fields, people will talk about issues that every real estate agent faces daily. If the topic is connected with loans, a person who’s an expert in the field might be included too.

These events, as we mentioned, are often a target for arguing over the fact if they are valuable or not. You can often see that a certain event was marked as fake, and then the organizer tries to deny this claim. For example, the BREIA reaction to scam article about their seminar made a turmoil in the field of real estate that made both parties lose points with their clients.

In other words, not every claim that something’s fake should be taken seriously. Sometimes it’s just battle against streams. If the event is paid and you can listen to some proven experts on this meeting, then there’s no need to even think about something like a fake lecturing by certain people.

These things are made for people to learn. Agents go there to listen to what professionals have to say about certain issues. They waste time, money, and lose hours of work to gain some benefits. The instructors do the same, so if there’s no profiting, then there’s no need for someone to think it’s a scam.

Are Real Estate Seminars Real or Fake? 1

Conclusion

There’s a very simple way to understand if something’s real and whether you can gain some knowledge out of it or not. Just see who’s going to be the instructor and run their name in the search bar to see who they are. See what people think about searching for potential clients here: https://businessofhome.com/articles/do-you-google-your-clients-before-you-meet-them.

If you get more results and it’s a name that is well known in the real estate world, then you know you’re not getting scammed. If you can’t find anything about this person, they’ve never been mentioned anywhere in the world of selling and buying property, then there’s a chance for this to be something you don’t want to attend to. It’s that simple.

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